Will we even recognize English 1,000 years from now?

I found both of these presentations on “The History of English” fascinating, and thought you would too.

I think that the way social movements affect the evolution of language speaks to the fact that we are connected as a population in more ways than we realize. But even with so many similarities between some languages, others tongues seem drastically different, with all their own sets of intricacies and details. On a similar note, what does language tell us about a culture? Is it culture that changes language or vice versa?

The number of ways English has changed in each passing generation makes me question whether we would even recognize our own language 100 years from now. What do you think English will sound like in 100 years, 1,000 years and so on?

I could go on and on, but that’s all for now, because I want to hear from you. Leave a comment on what you find to be the most interesting or what other questions the history of English might raise!

Professor Elliot Engel’s presentation doesn’t allow embedding, so you’ll have to follow this link. There are four parts, but all are more than worth the time to watch. The video below is great too. Enjoy.

—JDF